FM/CFS/ME RESOURCES - Drug Database - Acetaminophen

 

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Drug Database - Acetaminophen Tylenol 500 mg Tablet

Generic Name: Acetaminophen (a-seet-a-MIN-oh-fen)

Brand Names: Example: Tylenol®

Classification: Analgesic

Issue Date: 1961

Acetaminophen is an analgesic and antipyretic (lowers fever). It works by lowering a chemical in the brain that stimulates pain nerves and the heat-regulating center in the brain.

Acetaminophen is used for treating minor aches and pains due to headache, muscle aches, backache, arthritis, the common cold, flu, toothache, menstrual cramps, and immunizations, and for temporarily reducing fever.

  • Before Using This Medicine
  • Precautions
  • How to use Acetaminophen
  • Safety Information
  • Side Effects
  • Drug Interactions
  • Divider
    Before Using This Medicine

    Some medical conditions may interact with this medicine. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

    • if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding
    • if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement
    • if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances
    • if you have a history of alcohol abuse or you drink more than 3 alcohol-containing drinks every day
    • if you have liver or kidney problems, hepatitis, or phenylketonuria
    • taking anticoagulants (eg, warfarin) because the risk of their side effects, including bleeding, may be increased by Acetaminophen
    • taking isoniazid because the risk of liver problems may be increased

    This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Acetaminophen may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

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    Precautions

    Acetaminophen may harm your liver. Your risk may be greater if you drink alcohol while you are using Acetaminophen. Talk to your doctor before you take Acetaminophen or other fever reducers if you drink more than 3 drinks with alcohol per day.

    Severe or persistent sore throat or sore throat accompanied by high fever, headache, nausea, and vomiting may be serious. Consult a doctor promptly. Do not use for more than 2 days or give to children younger than 3 years old unless directed by a doctor.

    Acetaminophen may cause the results of some in-home test kits for blood cholesterol to be wrong. Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking Acetaminophen and need to check your blood cholesterol at home.

    For Pain and Fever in ADULTS:

    Stop use of Acetaminophen and ask your doctor if pain gets worse or lasts more than 10 days, fever gets worse or lasts more than 3 days, or new symptoms occur or redness or swelling is present.

    For Pain and Fever in CHILDREN:

    Stop use and ask a doctor if fever gets worse or lasts more than 3 days, pain gets worse or lasts more than 5 days, or redness or swelling is present or any new symptoms appear.

    PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING:

    If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Acetaminophen while you are pregnant. Acetaminophen is found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use Acetaminophen, check with your doctor.

    Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

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    How To Use Acetaminophen

    Use Acetaminophen as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

    • Take Acetaminophen by mouth with or without food.
    • Replace original bottle cap to maintain child resistance.
    • If you miss a dose of Acetaminophen and you are taking it regularly, take it as soon as possible.
    • If several hours have passed or if it is nearing time for the next dose, do not double the dose to catch up, unless advised by your health care provider. Do not take 2 doses at once.

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    Safety Information About Acetaminophen

    Acetaminophen has acetaminophen in it. Before you start any new medicine, check the label to see if it has acetaminophen in it too. If it does or if you are not sure, check with your doctor or pharmacist.

    Acetaminophen may harm your liver. Your risk may be greater if you drink alcohol while you are using Acetaminophen. Talk to your doctor before you take Acetaminophen or other fever reducers if you drink more than 3 drinks with alcohol per day.

    Severe or persistent sore throat or sore throat accompanied by high fever, headache, nausea, and vomiting may be serious. Consult a doctor promptly. Do not use for more than 2 days or give to children younger than 3 years old unless directed by a doctor.

    Acetaminophen may cause the results of some in-home test kits for blood cholesterol to be wrong. Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking Acetaminophen and need to check your blood cholesterol at home.

    For Pain and Fever in ADULTS:

    Stop use of Acetaminophen and ask your doctor if pain gets worse or lasts more than 10 days, fever gets worse or lasts more than 3 days, or new symptoms occur or redness or swelling is present.

    For Pain and Fever in CHILDREN:

    Stop use and ask a doctor if fever gets worse or lasts more than 3 days, pain gets worse or lasts more than 5 days, or redness or swelling is present or any new symptoms appear.

    PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING:

    If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using Acetaminophen while you are pregnant. Acetaminophen is found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use Acetaminophen, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby.

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    Side Effects

    Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction:

    • Hives
    • Difficulty breathing
    • Swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat

    Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

    • dark urine or pale stools
    • unusual fatigue
    • yellowing of the skin or eyes

    This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions or need medical advice about side effects, contact your doctor or health care provider. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088) or at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch.

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    Drug Interactions

    Some medicines may interact with Acetaminophen. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

    • Anticoagulants (eg, warfarin) because the risk of their side effects, including bleeding, may be increased by Acetaminophen
    • Isoniazid because the risk of liver problems may be increased

    There may be other drugs not listed that can affect Acetaminophen. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

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