FM/CFS/ME RESOURCES - Drug Database - D-Ribose

 

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Drug Database - D-Ribose D-Ribose

Other Names: Beta-D-ribofuranose

Ribose is a kind of sugar that is produced by the body. It is used as a medicine. It helps produce energy in the form of ATP (adenosinetriphosphate.) Medicinally, it's most often used to increase muscle energy and improve exercise performance.

In some illnesses, d-ribose is used to help improve exercise tolerance or prevent post-exercise pain, cramping and stiffness. Some evidence suggests that it's effective in people with conditions that impair the body's ability to produce energy. In people with heart disease, it may also help get energy to the heart during exercise.

  • Uses & Effectiveness
  • Dosing
  • Side Effects
  • Special Precautions & Warnings
  • Drug Interactions
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    Uses & Effectiveness

    Possibly Effective for:

    • Decreased blood flow through the arteries in the heart (coronary artery disease). Taking ribose orally seems to be effective for improving the heart's ability to manage low blood flow in people with coronary artery disease.

    • Myoadenylate deaminase deficiency (MAD). Taking ribose by mouth or intravenously seems to be effective for preventing symptoms such as cramping, pain, and stiffness after exercise in patients with MAD, also known as AMP deaminase deficiency (AMPD deficiency). One case report and a small research study suggest symptoms can be prevented by giving ribose before and during exercise.

    Insufficient Evidence for:

    • Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). There is some evidence that taking a ribose supplement (CORvalen, Valen Labs) daily might improve energy, sleep, and sense of well-being in people with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    • Fibromyalgia. Some research suggests that taking a ribose supplement (CORvalen, Valen Labs) daily can improve energy, sleep, sense of well-being and decrease pain in patients with fibromyalgia.

    • Congestive heart failure (CHF). Developing research suggests that patients with congestive heart failure who take a ribose daily for 3 weeks have better heart function and improved quality of life.

    • Coronary artery bypass surgery. Early research shows that people who take a ribose supplement immediately before surgery have better heart function after surgery.

    More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of ribose for these uses.

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    Dosing

    To improve the ability of people with coronary artery disease to exercise: 15 grams four times daily. Beginning 1 hour before exercise until the end of the exercise session, 3 grams every 10 minutes has been used to reduce muscle stiffness and cramps caused by exercising.

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    Side Effects

    Ribose seems to be safe for most people when taken by mouth for short-term use or when given by a healthcare provider intravenously. It can cause some side effects including:

    • diarrhea
    • stomach discomfort
    • nauseae
    • hives
    • headache
    • low blood sugar

    There isn't enough information about the safety of long-term use.

    This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. You may also report side effects at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch.

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    Special Precautions & Warnings

    Pregnancy and breast-feeding
    Not enough is known about the use of ribose during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

    Diabetes
    Ribose might lower blood sugar. When used along with diabetes medications that lower blood sugar, it might make blood sugar drop too low. It's best not to use ribose if you have diabetes.

    Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
    Ribose might lower blood sugar. If you already have blood sugar that is too low, don't take ribose.

    Surgery
    Since ribose might lower blood sugar, there is a concern that it might interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgery.

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    Drug Interactions

    Moderate Interaction Be Cautious With This Combination

    • Insulin interacts with RIBOSE
      Ribose might decrease blood sugar. Insulin is also used to decrease blood sugar. Taking ribose along with insulin might cause your blood sugar to be too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your insulin might need to be changed.

    • Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs) interacts with RIBOSE
      Ribose might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking ribose along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.

      Some medications used for diabetes include:

      • glimepiride (Amaryl)
      • glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase)
      • insulin, pioglitazone (Actos)
      • rosiglitazone (Avandia)
      • chlorpropamide (Diabinese)
      • glipizide (Glucotrol)
      • tolbutamide (Orinase)
      • and others


    Minor Interaction Be Watchful With This Combination

    • Alcohol interacts with RIBOSE
      Alcohol might decrease your blood sugar. Ribose might also decrease your blood sugar. Taking ribose along with alcohol might cause your blood sugar to go too low.

    • Aspirin interacts with RIBOSE
      Ribose might decrease blood sugar. Large amounts of aspirin might also decrease blood sugar. Taking ribose along with large amounts of aspirin might cause your blood sugar to go too low. But this interaction probably isn't a big concern for most people that take 81 mg of aspirin a day.

    • Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate (Trilisate) interacts with RIBOSE
      Choline magnesium trisalicylate (Trilisate) might decrease your blood sugar. Ribose might also decrease blood sugar. Taking ribose along with choline magnesium trisalicylate (Trilisate) might cause your blood sugar to be too low. But it is not clear if this interaction is a big concern.

    • Propranolol (Inderal) interacts with RIBOSE
      Propanolol (Inderal) might decrease blood sugar. Ribose might also decrease blood sugar. Taking ribose along with propanolol (Inderal) might cause your blood sugar to go too low.

    • Salsalate (Disalcid) interacts with RIBOSE
      Large amounts of salsalate (Disalcid) can cause blood sugar to become low. Taking salsalate along with ribose might cause blood sugar to become too low.

    Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with Darvon. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products.

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    Source:

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