FM/CFS/ME RESOURCES - Drug Database - Ketamine

 

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Drug Database - Ketamine Ketalar 10 mg/ml

Generic Name: ketamine (KET-a-meen)

Brand Name: Ketalar®

Classification: Anesthetic Medication

Issue Date: 1994

Ketamine is used as a general anesthetic to prevent pain and discomfort during certain medical tests or procedures, or minor surgery. Ketamine may also be used for purposes other than those listed here.

  • How To Use This Medicine
  • Precautions While on this Medicine
  • Side Effects
  • Overdosage
  • Drug Interactions
  • Divider
    How To Use This Medicine

    Ketamine is given as an injection through a needle placed into a vein or muscle. You will receive this injection in a clinic or hospital setting.

    Your caregivers will monitor your heart function, blood pressure, and breathing while you are under the effects of ketamine.

    You may feel strange or slightly confused when you first come out of anesthesia. Tell your caregivers if these feelings are severe or unpleasant.

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    Precautions While on this Medicine

    Before you receive ketamine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have a history of alcoholism.

    It may take you longer to recover from anesthesia with ketamine if you have recently used a barbiturate such as:

    • phenobarbital (Luminal)
    • secobarbital (Seconal)

    Or a narcotic medication such as:

    • fentanyl (Actiq, Duragesic)
    • hydrocodone (Lortab, Vicodin)
    • oxycodone (OxyContin)
    • propoxyphene (Darvocet, Darvon), and others

    Ketamine may be harmful to an unborn baby. Before you receive ketamine, tell your doctor if you are pregnant.

    You may feel strange or slightly confused when you first come out of anesthesia. Tell your caregivers if these feelings are severe or unpleasant.

    Ketamine can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions for 24 hours or longer. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. You will probably not be allowed to drive yourself home after your surgery or medical procedure.

    Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity after you recover from anesthesia.

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    Overdosage

    An overdose of ketamine is unlikely to occur since the medication is given by a doctor. Your vital signs will be closely watched while you are under anesthesia to make sure the medication is not causing any harmful effects.

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    Side Effects

    Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction:

    • hives
    • difficulty breathing
    • swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat

    Tell your caregivers AT ONCE if you have any of these SERIOUS side effects within 24 hours after you receive ketamine:

    • severe confusion
    • hallucinations
    • unusual thoughts
    • extreme fear

    Less serious side effects may include:

    • dream-like feeling
    • double vision
    • jerky muscle movements
    • dizziness, drowsiness
    • nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite
    • sleep problems (insomnia)

    This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

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    Drug Interactions

    Before you receive ketamine, tell your doctor if you have recently used any of the following:

    • a barbiturate such as:
      • amobarbital (Amytal)
      • butabarbital (Butisol)
      • mephobarbital (Mebaral)
      • secobarbital (Seconal)
      • phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton)
    • narcotic medication such as:
      • fentanyl (Actiq, Duragesic, Ionsys)
      • hydrocodone (Lortab, Vicodin)
      • hydromorphone (Dilaudid, Palladone)
      • methadone (Dolophine, Methadose)
      • morphine (Kadian, MS Contin, Oramorph)
      • oxycodone (OxyContin, Percocet, Roxicodone)
      • propoxyphene (Darvocet, Darvon), and others

    If you are using any of these drugs, it may take you longer to recover from anesthesia with ketamine.

    There may be other drugs that can affect ketamine. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

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