FM/CFS/ME RESOURCES - Drug Database - Magnesium Malate

 

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Drug Database - Magnesium Malate Magnesium Malate

Other Names: Chelated Magnesium, Dimagnesium Malate, Epsom Salts, Magnesia, Magnesia Carbonica, Magnesia Muriatica, Magnesia Sulfate, Magnesium Ascorbate, Magnesium Aspartate, Magnesium Carbonate, Magnesium Chloride, Magnesium Citrate, Magnesium Disuccinate Hydrate, Magnesium Gluconate, Magnesium Glycerophosphate, Magnesium Glycinate, Magnesium Hydroxide, Magnesium Lactate, Magnesium Malate, Magnesium Murakab, Magnesium Orotate, Magnesium Oxide, Magnesium Phosphoricum, Magnesium Phosphate, Magnesium Sulfate, Magnesium Taurate, Magnesium Taurinate, Magnesium Trisilicate, Milk of Magnesia, Mg, atomic number 12.

Classification: Mineral / Dietary Supplement

Magnesium is an essential mineral - important for normal cardiovascular (heart), muscle, nerve, bone and cellular function. The levels of magnesium found in most western diets are lower than is desirable for a number of different reasons - not least of which is the excessive consumption of alcohol, coffee and soda drinks. The body's requirement for magnesium can increase four to six fold when the body is under stress. It is a fascinating fact that around 60% of patients in intensive care units in this country are magnesium deficient.

Levels may be particularly low in the average British diet - partly due to our high national intake of dairy foods providing excessive calcium in our diets. Contrary to popular belief, both calcium and magnesium are essential for bone health, and low magnesium intake could account for the high levels of osteoporosis in the UK. The benefit of magnesium to muscle health makes it a good supplement for those with aches and pains - and this same muscle relaxant effect is part of the reason magnesium is such a benefit to heart health - and explains why it is credited with reducing high blood pressure.

Magnesium is also crucial for energy production and it is often of benefit to those with chronic fatigue problems. Magnesium is known as the 'anti-stress' mineral, and is important for the central nervous system. Several studies have also confirmed the benefits of taking magnesium for prevention of kidney stone formation - and we recommend one capsule per day for this purpose, with the addition of 10mg per day of vitamin B6.

  • Benefits
  • Warnings
  • Side Effects
  • Drug Interactions
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    Benefits

    Magnesium malate provides the benefits of both magnesium and malic acid. Magnesium plays an important part in the assimilation of calcium, while malic acid (a natural fruit acid) helps in the transformation of food into ATP (adenosine triphosphate).

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    Warnings

    Magnesium is safe for most people when taken by mouth or when the prescription-only, injectable product is used correctly. In some people, magnesium might cause stomach upset, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and other side effects.

    Doses less than 350 mg per day are safe for most adults. When taken in very large amounts, magnesium might be unsafe. Large doses might cause too much magnesium to build up in the body causing serious side effects including an irregular heartbeat, low blood pressure, confusion, slowed breathing, coma, and death.

    Magnesium is safe for pregnant or breast-feeding women when taken by mouth in the amounts recommended. These amounts depend on the age of the woman. Check with your healthcare professional to find out what amounts are right for you.

    Do not take magnesium if:

    • You have a heart problem called "heart block."
    • You have kidney problems such as kidney failure.

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    Side Effects

    People who have pre-existing medical conditions like bloating or diarrhea, should not take magnesium malate because both magnesium and malic can cause serious intestinal problems.

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    Drug Interactions

    • Antibiotics (Aminoglycoside antibiotics)

      Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider.

      Some antibiotics can affect the muscles. These antibiotics are called aminoglycosides. Magnesium can also affect the muscles. Taking these antibiotics and getting a magnesium shot might cause muscle problems.

      Some aminoglycoside antibiotics include amikacin (Amikin), gentamicin (Garamycin), kanamycin (Kantrex), streptomycin, tobramycin (Nebcin), and others.


    • Antibiotics (Quinolone antibiotics)

      Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider. Magnesium might decrease how much antibiotic the body absorbs. Taking magnesium along with some antibiotics might decrease the effectiveness of some antibiotics. To avoid this interaction, take these antibiotics at least 2 hours before, or 4 to 6 hours after, magnesium supplements.

      Some of these antibiotics that might interact with magnesium include ciprofloxacin (Cipro), enoxacin (Penetrex), norfloxacin (Chibroxin, Noroxin), sparfloxacin (Zagam), trovafloxacin (Trovan), and grepafloxacin (Raxar).


    • Antibiotics (Tetracycline antibiotics)

      Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider. Magnesium can attach to tetracyclines in the stomach. This decreases the amount of tetracyclines that the body can absorb. Taking magnesium along with tetracyclines might decrease the effectiveness of tetracyclines. To avoid this interaction, take calcium 2 hours before, or 4 hours after, taking tetracyclines.

      Some tetracyclines include demeclocycline (Declomycin), minocycline (Minocin), and tetracycline (Achromycin).


    • Bisphosphonates

      Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider. Magnesium can decrease how much bisphosphate the body absorbs. Taking magnesium along with bisphosphates can decrease the effectiveness of bisphosphate. To avoid this interaction, take bisphosphonate at least two hours before magnesium or later in the day.

      Some bisphosphonates include alendronate (Fosamax), etidronate (Didronel), risedronate (Actonel), tiludronate (Skelid), and others.


    • Medications for high blood pressure (Calcium channel blockers)

      Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider. Magnesium might lower blood pressure. Taking magnesium with medication for high blood pressure might cause your blood pressure to go too low.

      Some medications for high blood pressure include nifedipine (Adalat, Procardia), verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, Verelan), diltiazem (Cardizem), isradipine (DynaCirc), felodipine (Plendil), amlodipine (Norvasc), and others.


    • Muscle Relaxants

      Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider. Magnesium seems to help relax muscles. Taking magnesium along with muscle relaxants can increase the risk of side effects of muscle relaxants.

      Some muscle relaxants include carisoprodol (Soma), pipecuronium (Arduan), orphenadrine (Banflex, Disipal), cyclobenzaprine, gallamine (Flaxedil), atracurium (Tracrium), pancuronium (Pavulon), succinylcholine (Anectine), and others.


    • Water pills (Potassium-sparing diuretics)

      Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider. Some "water pills" can increase magnesium levels in the body. Taking some "water pills" along with magnesium might cause too much magnesium to be in the body.

      Some "water pills" that increase magnesium in the body include amiloride (Midamor), spironolactone (Aldactone), and triamterene (Dyrenium).

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    Sources:

    • RxList.com, Accessed on Oct. 31, 2009.

    • What Really Works.com, Accessed Oct. 31, 2009.

    • Diagnoseme.com, Accessed Oct. 31, 2009.

    • Smartbodyz Nutrition, Accessed Oct. 31, 2009.

    • Energetic Nutrition, Accessed Oct. 31, 2009.
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